Bandweaving Videos

There are a slew of wonderful how-to bandweaving videos out there, primarily by weaver Susan Foulkes, who focuses on pick-up style Sami bands. She often uses a special heddle that has extra slots (a Sunna or Sigga heddle) or extra holes (a Beaivi heddle) for pattern threads; however  you may also use any rigid heddle or even an inkle loom to create the same type of band. There are a number of great videos on her Youtube channel:

Five Ways of Weaving Narrow Bands:

Weaving Narrow Warp Faced Patterned Bands (This one uses a regular rigid heddle, not one with extra slots or holes):

Wedge Weave Resources

Wedge weave is a type of weaving style that gives a distinctive look as the “rows” are woven diagonally. According to what I’ve read, this style of weaving may have become less popular as buyers of rugs wanted a straight edge, and this gives a very unusual scalloped edge due to the way the weft pulls against the warp. There are many different ways to use this style, and some weavers drop in a little here and there while others weave this way for the entire project.

Here are some resources on wedge weave, also known as pulled warp:

Peter Collingwood has a very good overview of the technique in his Techniques of Rug Weaving book, available via PDF here. Scroll to page 164: https://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books/cp_rug1_2.pdf

Profile of weaver Connie Lippart: http://studio24-7.blogspot.com/2014/04/connie-lippert-wedge-weave.html, and a terrific overview article by her: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1034&context=tsaconf

Here are some image searches from Google (hopefully without the wedge shoes that keep showing up!): wedge weave images.

My little sample, about 4″ x 5″, worked out okay for a first try. I learned how to start and stop threads, add new colors, and carry a pattern. I also found out that the loose threads should be woven back in otherwise they’ll pop through to the front. I have some floats here and there, as I puzzled through how to reverse directions. I wove this on a Goodwood Pocket loom.

On the loom:

Wedge Weave Sample

And off the loom. I was pleased to see that even with my loose and sloppy weaving, the scalloped edges came through:

Wedge Weave Sample

Golf Tees as Bobbins

If you’re like me, making something useful for weaving out of an everyday object is appealing. Here, Dee explains how she uses 4″ wooden golf tees for inexpensive (albeit lightweight) tapestry bobbins: http://saffronknits.typepad.com/saffron_string_theory/2012/07/small-tapestry-bobbins-on-the-cheaphow-to-make-your-own-bobbins.html

Books and Journals from the Online Digital Archive

Every so often, I think of a weaving technique I'd like to try. One is the Moorman Inlay technique, which creates an embroidery-type patterns woven into a solid background. For a little discussion about it, read these posts on Weavolution. I also found this excellent pamphelt on the Online Digital Archive of Documents on Weaving. Maybe because weaving is still a bit of a fringe craft (get it? fringe craft?), and maybe because I enjoy wandering the aisles of thrift and antique stores searching for weaving treasures from days gone by,  I love reading the older documents about weaving:

Although it doesn't have the best images, it's a nice resource on how to get started. 

There are numerous out-of-print items on this site, and I love to browse the book section to see what gems are waiting to be found. Some of my favorites include:

Finally, the periodicals section lists numerous journals and pamphlets, and sometimes years and years of issues are included. I like seeing how much time is dedicated to the rigid heddle loom in some of these journals. Here's a sampling:

Warping Tricks

I've been thinking about built-in warping boards ever since I watched the commerical for a Clover loom (available in Japan only). The warping board is shown if you forward to the 1:40 mark. Here's a first try at adapting an expandable clothing rack to create a warping board on the Emilia. I think I could get twice as long of a wap if I zig-zag from side to side instead of go around in a circle. It looks strange, but it worked great.

image from www.flickr.com

A Clever Loom

I spotted this video while looking at Saori weaving videos earlier. It's an infomercial for a rigid heddle-type of loom made by the Clover (Hana-Ami) Company from Japan. I've seen similar rigid heddle looms where the heddle rotates or rocks and looks like a block of wood. What strikes me the most is the efficiency in warping. The loom has a built-in warping board that keeps the warp in place and under tension. It's simply rolled onto the warp bar after the ends are snipped. I wonder if this type of thing could be adapted to other rigid heddle looms. The board/pegs would need to fit in the frame of the loom and also have enough pegs for a decent length of warp. It makes me think! 

 

Great Tutorials on Warping a Table Loom

The Ashford loom company has some wonderful how-to videos on warping a multi-harness table loom. There are three sections: one on winding the warp, the second on transfering it to the loom and using a raddle, and the third on sleying and tying on. I picked up a ton of great tips by watching them.

So, the question is, why would I be watching tutorials on multi-harness table looms? Hmmmm… 

Stay tuned for the answer! (And if you're trying to guess, the answer is not an Ashford… )

In the meantime, enjoy these videos:

  1. Winding the Warp: http://www.ashford.co.nz/newsite/tutorials/video-tutorial-winding-a-warp
  2. How to Put a Warp on Your Table Loom, Part 1: http://www.ashford.co.nz/newsite/site-pages/video-tutorial-how-to-put-a-warp-on-your-table-loom
  3. How to Put a Warp on Your Table Loom, Part 2: http://www.ashford.co.nz/newsite/site-pages/video-tutorial-how-to-put-a-warp-on-your-table-loom-part-2