Category Archives: Tutorials

Two Harness Patterns

Last week, I was thinking that maybe, just maybe I'd get bored with a two-harness loom. I mean, using a rigid heddle + another heddle makes a three or four harness loom, which means patterns like twill are possible.

But with the Kessenich two-harness table loom, I'm kinda stuck with two harness. I had thought that meant plain weave, aka tabby.

So, I challenged myself to find some patterns and so I wandered over to Handweaving.net, clicked on the Draft Archives, clicked on search, and then asked for all the drafts with a minimum of two harnesses and a maximum of two harnesses. Guess how many results I had? 772.

Even if many of these are simply repeats of log cabin or stripes, I bet you anything I can find enough to keep myself busy with only two harnesses!

Handweaving.net and Ponchos!

My two new favorite websites/blogs, one for information, the other for inspiration:

Handweaving: Digital archives for handweaving history. Just look at the goodies found when the keywords rigid heddle and two harness weaving are used. PDFs and free… It's great!

El Telar de Anita: A blog so full of fantastic woven items, it's hard to know where to start. I'm studying ponchos for inspiration, and this cape has got me thinking…

Inkle Weaving on Rigid Heddle Loom

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

 

 

I was convinced I could weave an inkle-type band on my Glimakra Emilia. I studied several pictures of inkle looms, and even though they aren't expensive, I still wanted to try this on my loom. So, I dug up two curtain rods, putting one in the highest heddle notch and the other underneath the bottom of the loom. If I do this again, I would spend some time searching for a better dowel or metal skewer to hold the string heddles. 

I then cut and tied the string heddles, warped a very short and simple red and white warp, and started to weave. Even though I thought this would work, I didn't actually think it would work so well. The Emilia has a nice slant that made getting a wide shed easy.

After just 30 minutes of weaving, I had a slightly clunky but nicer-than-I-expected band. Next: dog leash??

Blogroll

There are numerous crafting blogs I visit regularly. Here are a few of them:

Weaving

Knitting

Weave-It rug loom video

The Weave-It Rug Loom is one of my favorite little looms. Awhile back, I was lucky enough to find this one at an antique store along with a plastic 4" Weave-It. The Rug Loom is a little bigger at 5" square and it has fewer pegs, but you wrap it exactly the same as the smaller loom. It was meant for using bulky, or a "rug" weight of yarn, and most of the patterns I've seen from the old booklets are for afghans or stuffed toys.
I like my Weave-It Rug Loom so much that I had to make a video. Hope you enjoy it!
Weave-It Rug Loom

Ruffled Cuff Wrist Warmers (I dare you to say that three times fast!)

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

My office is making attempts to save energy, and one of the ways we're accomplishing this is to lower the heat during the winter. And it's cold in January! So, I decided to make myself some wrist warmers to help keep my hands warm while I'm typing away at my job.

I designed these after conducting a fruitless search for wrist warmers (or hand warmers, or fingerless mitts… whatever you call them) made in the round on the blue Knifty Knitter. Having made mittens with the blue loom in the round, I figured there would be many different ideas out there. I found a few patterns, but most asked for small or regular gauge looms. Some were knitted as a flat panel on the blue loom and then stitched into a tube, but I just couldn't find a fairly easy, knitted-in-the-round pattern. So, I made one up off the top of my head!

BIG WARNING: Because I'm not a terrific pattern writer, there may be very easy ways to make a similar item without following these directions. Be creative! And please share with me what you did to improve it!

BIGGER WARNING: I was uncertain how to do the opening for the thumb so I made it up. The next time I make these, I'll probably remove the stitches from pegs 1-5 (Row 31 in the pattern below) and place them on a stitch holder, and then, after the item is off the blue loom, I may transfer the stitches onto the flower loom and knit three or four rows of the garter stitch. Stay tuned for improvements!

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RUFFLED CUFF WRIST WARMERS

Make two.

Needed:

  • Blue Knifty Knitter Loom (24 peg large gauge loom)
  • Knitting hook
  • Crochet hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Stitch makers to mark purling pegs (optional)
  • Yarn, approximately 125 yards: I used two strands of a worsted weight yarn (Patton 100% Merino Wool in Burgundy)

Notes:  

Instructions:

  1. Cast On. I use the cable cast on method.
  2. Rows 1-15 (CUFF): FS two pegs, PS two pegs. Keep up this pattern to create the cuff. Because the FS is a very snug stitch, the cuff looks ruffled when finished. Knit more rows for a longer cuff.
  3. Row 16-30 (BEGINNING OF HAND): FS.
  4. Row 31, PEGS 1-5 (THUMB OPENING): Lift loop from Peg 1 onto a crochet hook. Loop your working yarn over the hook, and pull it through Loop 1. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the loop. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Lift loop from Peg 2 onto you hook and pull through the first loop. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the Loop 2. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Move to Peg 3. Continue this pattern, creating a single chain, for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. Once Pegs 1-5 are safely crocheted, loop your final loop from your crochet hook onto Peg 6. You now have two loops on Peg 6, and no loops at all on Pegs 1-5.
  5. Row 31 (continued), Pegs 6-24: Knit off Peg 6. FS Pegs 7-24.
  6. Row 32, Pegs 1-5: You want to re-create new loops on your empty pegs. Use your working yarn and wrap Peg 1. Wrap Peg 1 a second time and KO. Wrap Peg 2. Wrap Peg 2 a second time and KO. Do this pattern for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. You will now have loops on all Pegs 1-5, and your working yarn is at Peg 6, ready to continue knitting in the round.
  7. Row 32 (continued), Pegs 6-24: FS Pegs 6-24.
  8. Rows 33-50 (TOP OF HAND): FS. NOTE: Knit as many rows as you'd like at this point. You want the mitt to reach to just below your knuckle area. Mine are a little too long.
  9. Row 51: PS
  10. Row 52-53: FS 2, PS 2. (Another option is: Row 51, PS. Row 52 FS. Row 53 PS.)
  11. Cast off. Use your tapestry needle to weave in any remaining threads.
  12. Finishing the Thumb: Use your crochet hook and yarn. Hook your crochet hook into one of the loops in the thumb opening, and crochet a single chain around the entire thumb opening, using up all the existing loops that border the thumb opening, one at a time. Be creative and make a fancy pattern if you so desire. If you find any open or weak areas areas after you're finished, reinforce these areas by either crocheting them or using some yarn and your tapestry needle and weaving in some reinforcing threads.

Mock Crochet Neck Warmer / Cowl

image from www.flickr.com 
I made this cowl by using two strands of Cascade 100% Merino Wool yarn and the round, yellow Knifty Knitter loom. It's a very loose neck warmer than hangs in folds but can be pulled over your head if you need a little extra warmth.>

The first time I started this, I used the regular e-wrap and one strand of yarn, but I didn't like the ladder-effect I was getting, so I frogged it all. The second time, I switched to using the mock crochet stitch, but it, too, was becoming too loose and airy, so I frogged it again. The third time's the charm–using two strands gave me the perfect thickness, but the stitch is more interesting than the normal e-wrap.

Here's a simple pattern I wrote up:

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Mock Crochet Neck Warmer

  • One skein yarn (Use two strands of worsted weight yarn or one strand of a bulky weight yarn.)
  • Yellow Knifty Knitter
  • Knitting tool

Cast on using your favorite method. (I use the cable cast on.) Start the Mock Crochet Stitch and continue throughout the entire project. Knit approximately 10" to 12". Cast off.

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There you have it! It's easy! Mine took approximately four hours from beginning to end.

Wonder Weave Loom

I found a great small loom at a thrift shop–the Wonder Weave! It came with instructions, two books of patterns (copyright 1964), a needle, and a finished square someone attempted, maybe 40 years ago. The Wonder Weave makes 4″ squares or 2″x4″ oblongs. I’ve had it two days, and I’m only three squares shy of making that hat I wrote about last time.

I was so happy with my $6 find that my husband helped me make a video tutorial:

 

Wonder Weave Loom