Category Archives: Loom Knitting

Ruffled Cuff Wrist Warmers (I dare you to say that three times fast!)

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

My office is making attempts to save energy, and one of the ways we're accomplishing this is to lower the heat during the winter. And it's cold in January! So, I decided to make myself some wrist warmers to help keep my hands warm while I'm typing away at my job.

I designed these after conducting a fruitless search for wrist warmers (or hand warmers, or fingerless mitts… whatever you call them) made in the round on the blue Knifty Knitter. Having made mittens with the blue loom in the round, I figured there would be many different ideas out there. I found a few patterns, but most asked for small or regular gauge looms. Some were knitted as a flat panel on the blue loom and then stitched into a tube, but I just couldn't find a fairly easy, knitted-in-the-round pattern. So, I made one up off the top of my head!

BIG WARNING: Because I'm not a terrific pattern writer, there may be very easy ways to make a similar item without following these directions. Be creative! And please share with me what you did to improve it!

BIGGER WARNING: I was uncertain how to do the opening for the thumb so I made it up. The next time I make these, I'll probably remove the stitches from pegs 1-5 (Row 31 in the pattern below) and place them on a stitch holder, and then, after the item is off the blue loom, I may transfer the stitches onto the flower loom and knit three or four rows of the garter stitch. Stay tuned for improvements!

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RUFFLED CUFF WRIST WARMERS

Make two.

Needed:

  • Blue Knifty Knitter Loom (24 peg large gauge loom)
  • Knitting hook
  • Crochet hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Stitch makers to mark purling pegs (optional)
  • Yarn, approximately 125 yards: I used two strands of a worsted weight yarn (Patton 100% Merino Wool in Burgundy)

Notes:  

Instructions:

  1. Cast On. I use the cable cast on method.
  2. Rows 1-15 (CUFF): FS two pegs, PS two pegs. Keep up this pattern to create the cuff. Because the FS is a very snug stitch, the cuff looks ruffled when finished. Knit more rows for a longer cuff.
  3. Row 16-30 (BEGINNING OF HAND): FS.
  4. Row 31, PEGS 1-5 (THUMB OPENING): Lift loop from Peg 1 onto a crochet hook. Loop your working yarn over the hook, and pull it through Loop 1. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the loop. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Lift loop from Peg 2 onto you hook and pull through the first loop. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the Loop 2. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Move to Peg 3. Continue this pattern, creating a single chain, for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. Once Pegs 1-5 are safely crocheted, loop your final loop from your crochet hook onto Peg 6. You now have two loops on Peg 6, and no loops at all on Pegs 1-5.
  5. Row 31 (continued), Pegs 6-24: Knit off Peg 6. FS Pegs 7-24.
  6. Row 32, Pegs 1-5: You want to re-create new loops on your empty pegs. Use your working yarn and wrap Peg 1. Wrap Peg 1 a second time and KO. Wrap Peg 2. Wrap Peg 2 a second time and KO. Do this pattern for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. You will now have loops on all Pegs 1-5, and your working yarn is at Peg 6, ready to continue knitting in the round.
  7. Row 32 (continued), Pegs 6-24: FS Pegs 6-24.
  8. Rows 33-50 (TOP OF HAND): FS. NOTE: Knit as many rows as you'd like at this point. You want the mitt to reach to just below your knuckle area. Mine are a little too long.
  9. Row 51: PS
  10. Row 52-53: FS 2, PS 2. (Another option is: Row 51, PS. Row 52 FS. Row 53 PS.)
  11. Cast off. Use your tapestry needle to weave in any remaining threads.
  12. Finishing the Thumb: Use your crochet hook and yarn. Hook your crochet hook into one of the loops in the thumb opening, and crochet a single chain around the entire thumb opening, using up all the existing loops that border the thumb opening, one at a time. Be creative and make a fancy pattern if you so desire. If you find any open or weak areas areas after you're finished, reinforce these areas by either crocheting them or using some yarn and your tapestry needle and weaving in some reinforcing threads.

Mock Crochet Neck Warmer / Cowl

image from www.flickr.com 
I made this cowl by using two strands of Cascade 100% Merino Wool yarn and the round, yellow Knifty Knitter loom. It's a very loose neck warmer than hangs in folds but can be pulled over your head if you need a little extra warmth.>

The first time I started this, I used the regular e-wrap and one strand of yarn, but I didn't like the ladder-effect I was getting, so I frogged it all. The second time, I switched to using the mock crochet stitch, but it, too, was becoming too loose and airy, so I frogged it again. The third time's the charm–using two strands gave me the perfect thickness, but the stitch is more interesting than the normal e-wrap.

Here's a simple pattern I wrote up:

_______________

Mock Crochet Neck Warmer

  • One skein yarn (Use two strands of worsted weight yarn or one strand of a bulky weight yarn.)
  • Yellow Knifty Knitter
  • Knitting tool

Cast on using your favorite method. (I use the cable cast on.) Start the Mock Crochet Stitch and continue throughout the entire project. Knit approximately 10" to 12". Cast off.

______________

There you have it! It's easy! Mine took approximately four hours from beginning to end.

Wind-powered knitting machine

You can find the strangest things on youtube, like this video of a knitting machine powered by a windmill:

wind knitting machine

 

And this old-fashioned sock knitting machine. It's mesmerizing to watch. (Okay, it's mesmerizing to watch if you like watching vintage sock knitting machines.)

Gearhart Sock Knitting Machine

Current project: I'm making a cowl on the yellow Knifty Knitter loom. I started it by using the pattern found at the Ben Franklin site, but after about 15 rows, I decided I didn't like the look of the plain e-wrap stitch. I was using just one strand of a Cascade wool in blue, and it was looking very ladder-ish. So, I frogged it all and began again, this time using the mock crochet stitch (instructions here). It's a very easy and pretty way to vary your loom knitting.

A not-quite-there-yet mitten

Mitten

I guess when you make something for yourself, you can be extra picky because you’re always checking to make certain it fits. This mitten does not fit!

I used the same ideas I used for my other set of blue loom mittens, only this time, I chose Paton 100% merino wool. I used a double strand, did a ribbed cuff and a gathered top. However, here’s what I don’t like about this poor mitten:

–The cuff is wider than the rest of the mitten. Because I chose the flat stitch for the majority of the mitten, the Purl 1, Flat Stitch 1 ribbing is too loose.

–I started the thumb too early. I need one more row before starting that thumb. now, it rides up a touch right below the thumb.

–The thumb is too snug/short. I should have used more pegs, plus it needed two extra rows.

–The top is too long. Now, here I’m getting picky. It’s only about one row too long.

So, there you have it. A failed mitten. Poor little thing. I intend on frogging it and starting over, making better notes this time. When I have a finished pair, I’ll do another post.

Olive, Loofah’s little sister

Olive
Loofah
Doggietoy

I knitted this doll using the same pattern as Loofah, only on the large end (8 peg) spool Knifty Knitter instead of the flower loom. She’s very tiny, about 4″. I think if I were going to make these dolls to give away, I’d have to find a way to keep the stuffing in place. As it is, you can tell the gaps between each row are so large you can see the polyfill. One idea I had is to use a child’s sock as a way to stuff the doll. I can also use a tighter stitch like I do for the head.

One more problem I’m having is with the hair. Right now, it looks okay, but it’s not durable and wouldn’t stand up to much playing. I separated strands of Lion Wool Ease but as they come apart, it’s easy to tear off sections. I need to research a way to make decent hair.
When we were visiting family over Thanksgiving, I knitted this ball with the flower loom. My plan was to make three of them, print out a “How to Juggle” tutorial, and give them as a gift. However, the little dog of the household got one look at this ball and decided it was hers. How could I refuse that face??

A loomed doll

Loofah

Meet Loofah!

I made this loomed dolly on the smaller (12 peg) flower Knifty Knitter. The pattern is Lulu the Loomed Dolly, and it’s Bev’s from Cottage Garden. She loom knits Lulu Dolls for charity.

When I saw her dolls, and I saw the Lulu that American Girl in Italy made, I had to give it a try. I used Lion brand wool (worsted weight) for the head and some left-over medium-weight wool for the body.

I didn’t have the 18 peg loom that Bev uses, so I used my brand-new flower loom. Compared to the smallest loom in the KK round loom kit, this one has 12 pegs vs. the 24 peg blue loom; however, it’s still large gauge.

It took me awhile to decide what stitch to use, because I knew I wanted the head to look different than the body. After starting four times, I ended up using a 1-over-3 wrapping and just the basic knit stitch. How I do this is I single wrap each peg, and I go completely around four times total. I then knit the bottom loop over the three remaining loops, and I do this for each peg. I then wrap just one strand around all pegs and continue.

I made the head this way by knitting 24 rounds. (If I was using thicker yarn it would have been many fewer times around.) I then switched colors and started the body. I used two strands here, plus I choose the garter stitch. I knitted Loofah’s body to be twice as long as her head.

When I neared the end of the body, I decreased by putting one existing loop on the neighboring peg and knitting off. I did this all around so I was left with six loops. I then gathered them all together just like a hat. I stuffed the doll with polyfill, and gathered the head.

When Loofah was at this stage, I decided the garter stitch wasn’t exactly attractive. It was, in fact, sorta odd looking. Although I had played around with some cutsie names like Magnolia, in the end, she most resembles a loofah gourd, so that’s her name: Loofah.

I knitted a little scarf on my other new KK loom: the spool loom. It makes two different sizes of i-cords. I used the smallest side, and I even added some tiny tassels. I then knitted Loofah a hat, so I went back to the flower loom and knitted about two inches. I decreased the top of the hat and gathered it off. The brim curled up on its own.

Finally, I decided Loofah needed some personality, so I had a try at stitching a face. She has a tiny pink mouth, two blue eyes, and some wild hair. You may notice one of her eyes is crooked–looks like I need some practice!

Because she’s wool, I wonder if she’d felt at all if I washed her. I’d have to de-stuff her first, but it may be a cool look. At this point, though, I’m a little attached to her, and I’d hate it if something bad happened to my lil’ Loofah.

I think Loofah was a great first doll. She’s pretty much a tube with a scarf and hat. Now that I have these smaller looms, it’ll be fun to knit her new things once and awhile like a blankie, shawl, and maybe even a couple of snazzy tube dresses!

By the way, it’s sure nice to have the kitties nearby. Whenever I need help choosing a color, they’re right there to lend a helping paw.

Finished: shawl

Shawl1
Shawl2

Last night I finished knitting this little shawl on the yellow Knifty Knitter.I used the pattern I listed below in a previous posting, by Rostitchery. Although I had some trouble decreasing, in the end, it turned out. Rowena had instructions to put the last loop on the near peg and KO. Then, wrap that “new” last peg, KO, and continue on down the row. I found this made the edge tight, not loopy like on my increase side. To try to make it match a little more, I would do just as she said by pulling the last loop to the second-to-last peg and KO. Then I would double wrap that final peg, knit 2-over-1, and continue down the row. Because the yarn is bulky and also varies in thickness, it passes just fine.

I used Moda Dea Cache in Tootsie, about 2.5 skeins. This is not a favorite yarn of mine. In fact, I bought it for $1/skein at Goodwill months ago. It makes a cute shawl, though!

My only thought on this shawl is whether or not is should be blocked. It fits snugly around the shoulders, and I like it that way, so I don’t think I will, but we’ll see.

This is a fast project to knit. I estimate it took me about five hours total.

Knitting Without a Loom (gasp!)

Dishcloth

That’s right. I suddenly had an urge to give knitting with needles a try, so I checked out a video from my local library and I started making the first project: a dishcloth. So far, I’ve learned to cast on, knit in the garter stitch, and increase by leaving a space. I have to admit, I enjoy using needles, especially because it gives a smaller gauge than the Knifty Knitter. I’ve played around with the idea of buying a smaller gauge loom, but we’ll see how it goes!

I’m using size 8 needles and a skein of Sugar ‘n Spice cotton. There’s one huge difference I’ve noticed so far between loom and needle knitting. Because I’m making smaller stitches, this is taking a long time!

Ziggy Zag Scarf, finished

Bluescarf

I realized I never posted a photo of my ziggy zag scarf even though I finished it last spring. I’ve been wearing it a lot this fall, and it’s just the right weight for not-so-cold days. I’d like to make a matching headband with the same yarn, but since it’s a little bit scratchy, I’m not sure if I’d like it.

I posted instructions on the ziggy zag stitch earlier. The scarf is about 55″ long. It curls a lot, but I don’t think blocking it will help because it only has a small amount of wool.

Final thoughts: cool pattern, nice color, but it curls in everywhere but the ends. I’m please because this was my first fancy item, but I’d choose a different yarn and probably do a border along each edge the entire scarf.

Shawl Woes

I’ve been making this pretty little shawl from Rostitchery’s blog: http://rowena.typepad.com/rostitchery/2006/12/give_a_little_g.html

However, I’ve encountered a problem. The first edge of the “V” has a loopy edge, made by how I interpreted her directions to skip one peg, knit the last peg, and then do a full row back. I have a funny feeling I shouldn’t have done it quite that way; however, I’m stuck with it. It looks nice.

But now I’m starting back up the opposite side of the “V” and I’m decreasing a peg each time. Instead of that nice loose edge, I have a normal edge. Hmmmm… I’m trying to figure out how to add an extra loop on this side of the shawl.

I’ve been using some of my stash of $1 Moda Dea Cache (Twinkle). I think I’ll end up using approximately 125 yards, or 2.5 skeins. Photos to come.

Fair Weather Non-Knitter

It just figures I’d go and be typical… when it’s cold, I knit. When it’s warm, I don’t. Since we’re creeping–no, make that speeding–toward the middle of August, I guess I can admit it! I’m a fair weather non-knitter.

Non-knitting isn’t all bad. I have plenty of time to think about knitting, imagine all the wonders I’ll create, and yet I don’t  have the hassle of making mistakes, frogging, and just plain giving up. Of course, I also don’t have the joy in finishing a project and all that goes along with it like the excitement of starting, the tiredness of staying up for just one more row…

In short, I haven’t given up on knitting but I have decided that a pile of wool in my lap on a ninety degree day is less than appealing. Yes, I considered using cotton, but still, it just hasn’t fit into my summer.

So, now that summer’s on the wane, although I suspect we have plenty of 90 degree days left, I’m just getting that inkling of interest in starting up a project. Some of my basic ones I may have mentioned before. They’re practical: I want to have a “knitting closet” to keep all my bits and bobbles organized, along with my stash (which is still small–I’ve resisted the urge to even look at yarn until I’m making an actual project); I also need my little knitting corner set up, and it’s almost there.

Finally, I’d like to unearth my digital camera so I can keep adding pics to this blog. Sometime during our move it went missing and we’ve yet to find it.

I’m not wanting to wish the summer away, but I am looking forward to cooler weather. Happy knitting!

BTW, if anyone has tips on making a calorimetry with a Knifty Knitter, please send me ideas!

Hooray! A loomy ‘zine

How cool is this? A loom-dedicated online ‘zine called, appropriately enough, The Loom Knitters Circle. Featuring patterns, articles, and a forum, this great site is just what loom knitters have been asking for. Visit it today!

As far as my own projects, I didn’t take any pictures but over the weekend I knitted four little hats for my nieces’ American Girls dolls. I used the blue loom, two strands of Moda Dea yarn, and invented a slightly different pattern each time.

I also finished my ziggy-zag scarf. In the end, I probably used 1.5 skeins of yarn. I’ll post a picture, soon!

Big Bubba comes to visit

Yarndog2
Yarndog3
Kittyicicle
Bigbunny

So, what brought yarn kitty and yarn dog out of the house on a winter day? In the past week we’ve had 30″ of snow, and yet there they were, both staring at something.

Could it be? Could it really be that they spotted Big Bubba, the harbinger of spring?

The kitty peered cautiously through an icicle. The dog bounded, but Bubba was too fast and got away! And least I think he got away.

Okay, enough silliness! What I really wanted to say is knitting bunnies is a good way to trigger spring. Even with all the snow, the sun is shining and the ice is melting the day after a winter storm. So, never again doubt the power of a pink, knitted bunny named Bubba.

I made this bunny using the same pattern as before, only this time I made him much bigger. I cast on 24 stitches on the blue loom and knit back and forth to create an 8.5″ square flat panel. I used the flat stitch and two strands of yarn–one Bernat Softee and one Moda Dea Dream. Because this bunny is so much larger than the other two, I had to guess how much bigger to make his ears. I cast on pegs 1-6 and purled the two middle pegs. I added two additional rows, and that’s all it took to make the ears. I did sew them on backwards so they had a floppier look.
Bubba is a little bit big, and although he’s cute, he’s no where near as cuddly as the little bunnies. Plus, his back legs look a little distorted.

But if Bubba can bring about spring, who can complain?

And what does yarn dog think about it all? Can she complain? “Nope,” she told me. “Bubba was delicious!”

(Just kidding.)

Ziggy Zag Stitch

Ziggyzagscarf

I started a scarf using the ziggy zag stitch. (You can find written directions for this stitch in the Yahoo Decor Accents Group. Go to Files, and then Stitches. Isela Phelps has written them up.)

To make this scarf, I’m using one strand of a beautiful blue wool blend. (Yarn Bee Mosiac Twist, Color: Moody Blue) and the red loom. This stitch needs an even number of pegs, so I cast on 12 pegs using the crochet cast on. Then I knitted one row and purled one row. This gives the scarf a non-curling edge. I then knitted back and forth for six rows using a stitch that’s described in Isela’s pattern. It’s a lot like the mock crochet stitch but instead of knitting three pegs at a time, you only use two. It’s an easy stitch to learn so I won’t describe it here.

Then, I started doing the ziggy zag stitch. This is a fun, pretty stitch but it can be a little complicated, so I’m posting some pictures of how I interpreted it. Please let me know if I’ve made a mistake.
Ziggyzag1
STEP ONE: To start, you flat stitch two pegs. In this picture (ziggyzag1) I’m doing the flat stitch on Peg One and Peg Two. Knit Peg One and then Peg Two. Don’t pull your yarn too tight. After you knit over Peg One and Peg Two, your yarn should be between Pegs Two and Three.
Ziggyzag2

STEP TWO: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg Two, and then pull it in front of Peg One. Purl Stitch Peg One (ziggyzag2). Now, the yarn should be to the right of Peg One.

Ziggyzag3

STEP THREE: Bring the yarn BEHIND Peg One and in front of Peg Two so your yarn is now between Pegs One and Two. Purl Stitch Peg Two (ziggyzag3).

Now, you’re ready to move onto Pegs 3 and 4 and repeat Steps 1-3. Continue this pattern until you reach the end of your row. Then head back the other direction. (Check Isela’s pattern for clarification.)

This is a really pretty stitch. It gives a zig-zagged edging, too, so you may want to include a border on either side of your project.

Bunnies!

Bunny2
Bunnyears
What better way to spend a snowy weekend than knitting a couple of cute bunnies? We may have had 20″ of snow this weekend, but these little, cute, pink, fluffy bunnies didn’t seem to care. I used the blue loom and the free pattern (PDF) from the Loom Knitting store. These bunnies knit up in about an hour. You start by knitting a flat panel using 15 pegs. Then, you knit two ears, a tail, and you sew it and stuff it.
For my first bunny I used two strands of Bernat Softee Chunky. When I started the ears, I accidently read the pattern wrong and knitted at least two rows too many, but it looks sort of cute that way, more like Amigurumi than a bunny. For this bunny, I kept the “knit” side facing out.
I then did another one using two strands of Moda Dea Dream (Color: Blush). It’s very soft and fluffy. I probably should have used three strands because they were so skinny… Next time, maybe. This one I followed the ear pattern more closely and they turned out pretty cute. This bunny has the “purl” side facing out.
These bunnies are very small–no more than six or seven inches long. I’d like to knit a bigger bunny, maybe using the blue loom but instead of just 15 pegs, I’d use all 24 pegs. I’m guessing I’d have to knit at least 40 rows. If it keeps snowing, maybe I’ll do just that!

P.S. Hey, all you Vox-ers. Did you know you can now customize your banner? B designed this new one of my yarn lovin’ cat!