Tag Archives: weaving

Wedge Weave Resources

Wedge weave is a type of weaving style that gives a distinctive look as the “rows” are woven diagonally. According to what I’ve read, this style of weaving may have become less popular as buyers of rugs wanted a straight edge, and this gives a very unusual scalloped edge due to the way the weft pulls against the warp. There are many different ways to use this style, and some weavers drop in a little here and there while others weave this way for the entire project.

Here are some resources on wedge weave, also known as pulled warp:

Peter Collingwood has a very good overview of the technique in his Techniques of Rug Weaving book, available via PDF here. Scroll to page 164: https://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books/cp_rug1_2.pdf

Profile of weaver Connie Lippart: http://studio24-7.blogspot.com/2014/04/connie-lippert-wedge-weave.html, and a terrific overview article by her: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1034&context=tsaconf

Here are some image searches from Google (hopefully without the wedge shoes that keep showing up!): wedge weave images.

My little sample, about 4″ x 5″, worked out okay for a first try. I learned how to start and stop threads, add new colors, and carry a pattern. I also found out that the loose threads should be woven back in otherwise they’ll pop through to the front. I have some floats here and there, as I puzzled through how to reverse directions. I wove this on a Goodwood Pocket loom.

On the loom:

Wedge Weave Sample

And off the loom. I was pleased to see that even with my loose and sloppy weaving, the scalloped edges came through:

Wedge Weave Sample

Wedge Weave Weaving

I’m using my Glimakra Emilia rigid heddle loom as a stand-in tapestry loom, and it works great. The loom is a super star when it comes to tension–that thick, sturdy wood and metal pawls and ratchets make it possible. If I learn how to warp it better, I can see using this for tapestry weaving quite often. As it is, I started out perfectly with a warp wound on a warping board, but transferring over became very difficult, so I ended up snipping the ends and tying it on. My plan had been to try for a non-fringe selvedge. Oh, well… that’s how it goes.

I had started another project using greens and browns on this warp, but when I discovered wedge weave, I unwove the other project and started this. I’m now sticking with all greens, probably inspired by the ongoing WAL in Ravelry’s tapestry group. The first two months were monochromatic, and I wove a tiny tapestry in blues, but I was never happy with it. So now… greens! These are mostly needlepoint wool found at an antique store:

Greens

The warp is a four-ply Churro, and it’s spaced at about 5 epi:

Greens

The string heddles I rigged up proved to be helpful only when weaving that footer. I don’t think anyone trying something similar needs to go to the trouble if using a widely-spaced warp like this one. The day wore on, and at 10 p.m. I found myself still weaving. Wedge weave is really fun–and fast as far as a weft-faced weaving goes. Now, I’m at a difficult spot in deciding what to do with the pattern. I’d like to make the center area stand out somehow, and the easiest answer is to use a different set of greens. The hardest answer is to inset some type of tapestry design, but I’m not certain how that will work out. Best idea is to try one, and if it works, stick with it.

Night Weaving

Complementary Tapestry, Nearly Sailing

The cheerful sailboat is starting to come to life. If you think it looks kind of angular, you’d be right. At some point, I’ll post about the design, but because I’m usually willing and able to tear out and do over, design is an ongoing thing for me.

All the different sails. I knew it would look downright odd, but it was actually kind of fun to try out different colors and designs:

Decisions, decisions

I need to do some work on the right side of the right sail. There’s also that odd blue wedge between the two sails that needs to be toned down or taken out completely:

Complementary Color Tapestry

Complementary Color Tapestry (WAL)

The second challenge in the Tapestry Ravelry WAL is a complementary color tapestry. I know nearly nothing about color, and so it’s been very educational. Of course, I didn’t pick subtle, soothing color combinations… just the eye-sizzling ones! That blue water is very loud.

I’m using my C. Cactus Flower Mini… upside down. Oops! It was a mistake, but I don’t think there’s any real difference with the weaving. Ergonomically, it’s easier to weave with the bottom bar on your lap. I’m using a tatting shuttle here and there, but I wouldn’t recommend it. It catches on the warp threads. The tapestry will end up being about 7.5″ x 11″.

Complementary Color Tapestry

More water. I’m totally experimenting with this, using a dark blue cotton embroidery thread and a lighter blue. The complementary color to blue directly across the color wheel is orange. Get ready for an orange boat!

Complementary Color Tapestry

The boat started out a little shaky. I had framed it on either side with too much muddy-looking water, and I didn’t care for the angle of the boat. This design is very geometric, and so I unwove the top section and started over. The “old” one is on the left, and the “new” one is on the right.

Are your eyes bugging out yet? Sorry about that.

Before and After

To be continued!

Finished (Finally!): Tapestry Weaving

It only took me about ten months to finish this 4″x6″ weaving. Honestly, the Lightning Weaver is an awesome loom and I’ve used it for several small tapestries, but quite awhile ago, I wished I hadn’t started this type of a project on it. I used embroidery thread and needles to weave it. At 12 epi, it was pretty fine. My goal when I began was to work in more curves and colors. You can tell I jumped into “finish” mode where the lines start traveling from selvedge to selvedge. I went back to shapes near the end.

The Lightning Weaver has little hooks on either end, which makes it impossible to weave up until the edge. So, I’m left with some white threads poking out, but that’s okay. Throughout the weaving, I overlapped where I started and stopped threads. This keeps the back very tidy. Any loose threads can be safely trimmed away.

Tapestry Experiment

Tapestry Experiment

Back:

Tapestry Experiment

Finished: Snappy Plaid, Grey and Pink

This cozy little scarf was completed yesterday. It’s another rectangle loom scarf using my Hideaway Homestead loom on the 10″ x 48″ setting. I’ve found they “shrink” in width about 2″ or more, but the length stays about the same. The yarn was Yarn Bee First Love, which is 100% polyester. It holds its shape very nicely off the loom: