Category Archives: Glimakra Emilia

Frogging, weaving style

So, in a crazy fit of I-really-don't-like-this-at-all-REALLY, I cut off my clasped weft project and tossed it. If it was a knitting project, it would have been frogged, but seeing that it's a weaving project, all caught up in strands, it was tossed.

It wasn't that I didn't want a clasped weft strap, it was more that I didn't like the colors, and the pattern wasn't to my liking. So, "snip." Thankfully, the yarn was very-nearly free, and the warp was extremely short, so there wasn't much waste.

In other news, I'm happily waiting for "The Weaver's Idea Book: Creative Cloth on a Rigid Heddle Loom," by Jane Patrick. There's an awful lot of excitement about it on Ravelry, and some are saying it will rank alongside Betty Linn Davenport's classic, "Hands on Rigid Heddle Weaving." We'll see!

Nearly there… Doni’s Deli bag

I spent a few hours sewing the seams of my Doni's Deli bag. It's a little tricky, but I pinned it together and suddenly it all made sense. I decided to sew the handle edges together, but I'm uncertain about how it looks. I may tear out that seam and leave it. I had left enough fabric to create an inside pocket, but I also like letting it drape over the top. If I added a big button, it'd look pretty cute!
What's left? Maybe re-doing the handle, maybe making a pocket/adding a button, maybe adding a liner. This is one big project!

 

Fabric, drying

Fabric, drying

Here's the full fabric for my Doni's Deli bag, drying outside in the hot sun. I have a front-loading washing machine, and I was hesitant to wash this alpaca, wool, bamboo mixture, so I did it on the hand wash cycle. Some of the loopy selvedges did even out (as promised by the experts on Ravelry), but overall, the fabric was the same. So, I got brave and tossed into a regular load on warm. It came out exactly the same. 

So, although I didn't notice the words "Super Wash" on any of my yarn, it obviously doesn't want to felt. The good news is that I have a long enough piece to try to add a pocket to my bag.

 

 

 

All of a sudden, color

What's come over me? Bright green! Aqua! Tangerine! I'm normally a plain Jane with yarn color, but all of a sudden, I seem to want colorful, bright, cheerful yarn. The mohair may become a scarf–a very shrieking orange one. After reading a number of stories about the danger of using mohair as a warp, especially with a smaller dent heddle, I purchased that Cascade off-white cotton as the warp. The thin cotton crochet thread was a six pack. So far, it's turning into a groovy-looking, clasped-weft strap.

 

Doni’s Deli bag fabric

It's been over two months since I warped my Emilia and started weaving the fabric for a bag like the one at Doni’s Deli. Why two months? Well, I made some beginner mistakes, which I don't have to list, but the main one was I chose sock yarn for both the warp and weft. With a 12 dent heddle I probably would have been okay, but I only have a 10 dent heddle, and it took a gazillion rows and hours (at least!) to finish the fabric, which measures 100".

Now for washing, hemming, sewing… Later. For now, I'm content to watch it come off the loom a couple dozen times. (Note, this short video is uploaded to Flickr):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29158529@N03/4929649306/

When I neared the end, I ran out of my main sock yarn and also my patience, so I dedicated the final few inches to experimenting with the clasped weft technique. If you're interested, there's a short tutorial available here, and lots of lovely examples posted on blogs.

 

Curtain sash, sampler, and freezer jam

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

 

I reorganized my little home office, tossing out junk, weeding through old paperwork, organizing a closet, and giving away several boxes of books. I blame it all on my new Glimakra Emilia loom. Once I started weaving, I needed to have lots of things at hand, and so I had to organize. Plus, having such a nice loom in such a messy space just wasn't right. Although it kept me from actually weaving for awhile, the cleaning was worth it. I now have a super cute and organized work area… and I'll post pictures of my new space next time. (My battery gave out.)

Once my space was ready, I set up my loom again, warped it with some cotton, and made three curtain sashes for our bedroom. They ended up a little short, and so I braided some loops to fasten them. To make these, I warped about 90" of cotton, and tugged each weft strand tightly, and used my inkle shuttle, trying for a warp-faced band. Because the cotton was pretty sticky, it didn't quite work out, but it's more band-like than if I had gone for a balanced weave. They were 14" each, and I only had about 6" of warp left. When I improve as a weaver, I'll make these again, this time going for about 18". I'll also use a slicker cotton and brighter colors.

I then started a fun project, using that old Red Heart acrylic that's been hanging around forever. I decided to do a sampler, using a bunch of different patterns from Betty Linn Davenport's Textures and Patterns for the Rigid Heddle Loom. What an amazing book! If you have any interest at all in weaving on a rigid heddle loom, borrow or buy this one. I started with a warp-faced float pattern and next will be a honeycomb pattern. Seriously, it's like Christmas morning playing around with these patterns. Everything is fun and just what I wanted… except for that one mistake. (Don't look too closely.) These patterns are created by using a pickup stick (it can be a ruler or shuttle, just something longer than your weft) that sits behind the heddle. After you set it up for your pattern (sometimes under threads, sometimes over), you can create really beautiful patterns by incoporating the pattern stick into the regular up and down weaving. Here's a little video I found on Youtube.

For my first attempt, I had to read the entire introduction several times. It finally dawned on me that the pattern or pick-up stick can only be used on the slot threads. And once I realized that, I saw it was one of the first things Betty wrote about. It's funny how learning something new comes in bits and pieces, and then all of a sudden it comes together. I'm interested in seeing how the sampler turns out, because even though I dislike using the acrylic (it's worsted weight, a little too thick for a 10 dent heddle), it's actually pretty.

And finally, it's June! Strawberry jam time. Last year was the first time I made freezer jam, and this weekend, I made six quarts-worth. Lots of fun, and so nice in January…

 

Experimenting with rags

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

 I just warped my loom with about 90″ of sport-weight Sinfonia mercerized cotton, and wanting to try something different, I did every other slot to stagger the warping threads. I “think” this makes the heddle closer to a 5 dent (it’s a 10 dent heddle). Because I didn’t do an even stagger, however, I’m getting a pattern, but I like it. I think I kept weaving too long with my scrap yarn. Still learning…