Tag Archives: goodwood

Little Wall Hanging

The 1970s are cool again–if you’re a fiber nerd, that is. Maryanne Moodie was the first weaver I spotted who was calling upon the age of shag carpeting to create a more-modern-but-still-earthy wall hanging. There are several weavers out there doing very creative wall hangings nowadays. If you’re inspired to give it a try, here’s a nice tutorial to get you going.

Wall Hanging

I wove mine on the little Goodwood Pocket Loom, not made any longer, but pretty much any small loom or picture frame will work. This measures 4″x5″ off the loom, not counting the fringes. This was a fun, fast project that I’d like to do on a larger scale… maybe on my new loom. And, no, I’m not talking about the new loom I just posted a few weeks ago but another one, a Hagen tapestry loom that I’ll blog about soon.

Wall Hanging

Wedge Weave Resources

Wedge weave is a type of weaving style that gives a distinctive look as the “rows” are woven diagonally. According to what I’ve read, this style of weaving may have become less popular as buyers of rugs wanted a straight edge, and this gives a very unusual scalloped edge due to the way the weft pulls against the warp. There are many different ways to use this style, and some weavers drop in a little here and there while others weave this way for the entire project.

Here are some resources on wedge weave, also known as pulled warp:

Peter Collingwood has a very good overview of the technique in his Techniques of Rug Weaving book, available via PDF here. Scroll to page 164: https://www.cs.arizona.edu/patterns/weaving/books/cp_rug1_2.pdf

Profile of weaver Connie Lippart: http://studio24-7.blogspot.com/2014/04/connie-lippert-wedge-weave.html, and a terrific overview article by her: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1034&context=tsaconf

Here are some image searches from Google (hopefully without the wedge shoes that keep showing up!): wedge weave images.

My little sample, about 4″ x 5″, worked out okay for a first try. I learned how to start and stop threads, add new colors, and carry a pattern. I also found out that the loose threads should be woven back in otherwise they’ll pop through to the front. I have some floats here and there, as I puzzled through how to reverse directions. I wove this on a Goodwood Pocket loom.

On the loom:

Wedge Weave Sample

And off the loom. I was pleased to see that even with my loose and sloppy weaving, the scalloped edges came through:

Wedge Weave Sample