Tag Archives: heddle

Cyprus Band Design

Sample Band Plus Second Attempt

On the left is the sample I completed. After all that complaining, I realized it looks better off the loom than I thought it would, and I’m pleased with it, wavy selvedges and all. I’ve started a new one, all wool, and it’s also nice but doesn’t have the crispness that the cotton added. I altered the design somewhat so the bottom and top will match a little more. I’m thinking I can do several of these as bookmarks.

Band Weaving: Trial and Error… and Error

Is it me? Is it the heddle? Or, is it the combination of materials? Probably a little of all three.

Trial and Error

I started an ambitious band design, something I found in the files of the Yahoo group, Bands and Braids. This design wasn’t charted, so I put it into a grid. Turns out it has 68 picks for one complete design… that’s a lot! You can see where I started and stopped and started again. I chose cotton for the background threads and wool for the pattern threads, and I found I had a similar problem to the previous band I completed: the cotton is saggier than the pliable wool, and that leads to tension problems. Plus, the wooden double-slotted heddle I bought has some snags here and there which are doing a number on the warp and it’s fraying quite a bit. I’m not totally thrilled with the heddle, but I’m willing to sand down the slots, which should help; however, I’ve gone ahead and ordered two different sizes of double-slotted plastic heddles and a few other doo-dads from Stoorstalka.

I’m anxious to try an all-wool band and set the cotton aside for awhile. I like the lacy and light feeling it adds, so I’ll use it again when I’m more experienced.

Wedge Weave Weaving

I’m using my Glimakra Emilia rigid heddle loom as a stand-in tapestry loom, and it works great. The loom is a super star when it comes to tension–that thick, sturdy wood and metal pawls and ratchets make it possible. If I learn how to warp it better, I can see using this for tapestry weaving quite often. As it is, I started out perfectly with a warp wound on a warping board, but transferring over became very difficult, so I ended up snipping the ends and tying it on. My plan had been to try for a non-fringe selvedge. Oh, well… that’s how it goes.

I had started another project using greens and browns on this warp, but when I discovered wedge weave, I unwove the other project and started this. I’m now sticking with all greens, probably inspired by the ongoing WAL in Ravelry’s tapestry group. The first two months were monochromatic, and I wove a tiny tapestry in blues, but I was never happy with it. So now… greens! These are mostly needlepoint wool found at an antique store:

Greens

The warp is a four-ply Churro, and it’s spaced at about 5 epi:

Greens

The string heddles I rigged up proved to be helpful only when weaving that footer. I don’t think anyone trying something similar needs to go to the trouble if using a widely-spaced warp like this one. The day wore on, and at 10 p.m. I found myself still weaving. Wedge weave is really fun–and fast as far as a weft-faced weaving goes. Now, I’m at a difficult spot in deciding what to do with the pattern. I’d like to make the center area stand out somehow, and the easiest answer is to use a different set of greens. The hardest answer is to inset some type of tapestry design, but I’m not certain how that will work out. Best idea is to try one, and if it works, stick with it.

Night Weaving

So Long, Erica. Farewell, Peacock.

Believe it or not, every so often I wave goodbye to a loom. Recently, I sold my 25″ Erica rigid heddle loom to a new weaver who wanted to give it a try. The 12″ two harness Peacock, a teeny, vintage loom in need of new heddles and love, was also sent to a new home.

But even though I feel some relief and, yes, a bit smug, after sending these two out into the world (I’ve downsized! I’ve gained some space!), that hasn’t stopped me from welcoming a few more: one new, one old. (Hmmm… there goes that smugness.) I’ll blog about them at another time.

In the meantime, thanks for the memories, Erica. Glad to have known you, Peacock.

T-shirt bath mat, again

peacockloom2

Finished: Useful Scarf

Here’s a useful, soft, and warm scarf woven out of a single ply wool called Manos Maxima. I wove it very quickly on my Ashford Sampleit over the weekend. The Sampleit has proven its worth as a portable loom as I brought it to work on Friday. Several of my coworkers knit or crochet, and now I can weave. The loom tucks into a medium-sized duffle, and I actually warped it and wove a few inches. Over the cold weekend, I finished the scarf while under a blanket on the couch. My other looms are getting jealous.

Finished: Useful Scarf

Finished: Brown and White Scarf

This ranks as the warmest scarf I’ve ever made. The brown and natural wool is from my amazing find at Goodwill. I’ve made three items (this scarf, the triloom blanket, and the triloom bias shawl). Believe it or not, I still have enough for one more project. The brown wool is denser and scratchier than the natural. I don’t mind, but I can’t imagine many people would seek it out.

This scarf was warped and woven in one day. I used a single warp float pickup pattern from Jane Patrick’s book. Because this is wool, I assumed it would shrink, but even in the hottest water, it only lost an inch in width. I suppose that it shrunk more with the open weave of the triloom.

The temperature is supposed to be below zero (F) this week, so maybe it’ll be woolen scarf weather, even if it’s a little scratchy.

Review of the Ashford Sampleit

I finished weaving the log cabin scarf in just one day. The little Ashford Sampleit is a great loom for me. It wasn’t that easy to put together because the instructions were pretty minimal. But once assembled I was able to quickly warp it using some cotton I had on hand, and I wove this cheerful blue and white scarf. The loom comes with a 7.5 dent heddle, so I’m looking through my stash for worsted to bulky weight yarns.

This loom is so tiny (18″ long by 11.5″ wide) that I do use it as a lap loom. I also bought an inexpensive duffle so I can take it along on trips. The shed is great for such a tiny loom: 1.5″. The up and down sheds both stay put. The weaving width is about 8″.

This loom has the new Ashford clicker pawl system, so you can can advance the warp easily. I dislike plastic pawls and ratchets, and these are plastic. Hopefully they’ll hold up to a lot of use, because I can see I’ll be using this loom quite a bit!

Review of the Ashford Sampleit