Tag Archives: knifty knitter

Scarves in Trees

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

 

It's true. Scarves have taken to the trees, and here are the pictures to prove it! 

The first, a bright orange mohair/merino scarf which was knitted on the blue Knifty Knitter loom with the garter stitch, literally jumped off the wearer's neck and wound itself around this branch. 

The second, a lovely rayon multicolored woven scarf, made on the Glimakra Emilia with a 10 dent heddle, scrambled away from the person attempting to photograph it and took refuge in a nearby Elm. 

Although the mohair scarf was captured and is now safely tucked into an arm of a jacket, the colorful rayon scarf is still a bit wild and will most likely be mailed out to a niece, who had recently requested a "blue, purple, red, yellow, white, and green" scarf. (Okay, there's not much blue or white, but it's close!) It is hoped she will be able to train the scarf to stay around her neck, which is where it belongs.

Yellow Loom Hat

Yellowloomhat2
Yellowloomhat1

In the past, I knitted a hat with the large gauge yellow Knifty Knitter loom, but it turned out too big. The yarn was an acrylic mix that didn't have much stretch, and so the hat was droopy. However, I feel the green loom is a little too small, so I tried the yellow loom again, this time using Lion Brand Wool Ease Thick and Quick. I decided to make a very long brim so I could fold it up. I did a K2, P2 brim, but because the yellow loom has an uneven number of pegs, I had to do a K3 on the final three pegs to keep the ribbing even. I knit about 4" (or 20 rows) for a brim, and then switched to the regular e-wrap stitch.

On the Yahoo Knifty Knitter group, I had read about finishing off a hat without doing the typical gather and I wanted to try it, so when I got near the top, I divided the loom into four sections with stitch markers (10 pegs, 10 pegs, 10 pegs, and 11 pegs), and decreased one peg as I knitted back and forth. For example, I knitted Peg 1 through Peg 10. On the way back I decreased one loop, and then knitted Peg 9 through Peg 1. Then I decreased another loop and knitted Peg 2 through Peg 9. When I got down to the final peg, I wrapped it with the working yarn, cut the yarn to about 12", and knitted the peg off, pulling the yarn through the final loop. Decreasing in this manner creates a triangle. I then did the final three sections (on the fourth section, I decreased two pegs on the first row because it has 11 pegs, not 10 like the others.) I turned the hat inside out and stitched the triangles together on the seams using the mattress stitch. 

I really like my new hat. It's warm, fits just right, and looks great on a pumpkin.

Rectangle loom ribbed scarf

 

I've been hankering to make a scarf, and after much thought, I chose a lovely Berroco Merino Pure in bordeaux. I decided to try the whole thing in a garter stitch pattern on the blue Knifty Knitter. After much trial and error, I frogged it and started again, this time on needles. After another try, I frogged it again, wondered why I really needed another scarf, and put everything away.

But today, I decided I really wanted another scarf, so I pulled out my little-used purple rectangle loom, an absoloutely enormous amount of Cascade Eco+ (7811) — one skein is about 475 yards — and an old sheet of wrapping patterns. Using just ten pegs (twenty if you count both the top and bottom) and a ribbed pattern, after just an hour or so, I had nearly two feet of my very, very purple scarf finished.

(NOTE: The drawings of the different ways to wrap came from the Yahoo Knifty Knitters Loom group files. It's under General Information and it's called "Various Wraps for a Board Loom." I'm using the Rib Wrap. It's also located here as a download.)

Flowers and an amazing find

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

I've been busy making flowers, both with my Crazy Daisy Winder and my trusty Knifty Knitter flower loom. It's funny that I needed to find another flower loom–the Crazy Daisy–to realize I already owned one. So far, I'm doing fine with the wrapping, using yarn or embroidery floss (more on that later) but the stitching of the middle is a bit tough. I'm getting there, however, and have big plans for my flowers. You can see I'm using different wraps. On the Knifty Knitter loom, I wrap the pegs between two to four times, but the little Daisy loom only takes once or twice to make a full flower.

This week, I decided to buy some embroidery thread for the Daisy loom. The yarn I was using just wasn't fine enough, plus I thought the bright colors and smooth texture of floss would make for some pretty flowers. One night I stopped at the only store that's on the drive home–Walmart–and found they no longer carry floss! I was just a little shocked. The next night, we stopped to browse in a local thrift/discount store in town and I was thrilled to find a big tin of embroidery floss for about $9.00. Once I got home, I started looking through the stash and realized it was even more special than I first thought.

The floss is old, but the colors are still vivid. Many of them are marked two cents ($.02) but most are priced at eight cents ($.08). When was the last time embroidery floss sold for two cents?? I realized that this was a very old collection, put together by someone who really loved to embroider. Most of the collection was carefully stored in plastic bags, but there was a bunch tangled together. Somewhere from within that colorful nest I found a few needles, a strand of pefectly teeny tiny red beads (can you imagine the care it would take to embroider beads that size?!), and a big clue to the time/place of the collector: an ad from a Wisconsin newspaper with the date of 1932 on the bottom.

Many of the embroidery threads are marked from J.C. Penney, but most say France. I've been carefully selecting some accent colors from this tin to highlight my flowers. I have a feeling it will last a long time, and I'm so pleased to have found it.

Crazy Daisy Winder

This winter I ventured outside of loom knitting by first purchasing a cheap, plastic potholder loom and then, after a few disasterous attempts at making my own, a professionally-made 4" square loom from Hazel Rose. With the potholder loom, I made a potholder (gasp!) and also a scarf. With the Hazel Rose 4" multiloom, I made several squares with different yarns, but then became focused and made a hat from the 1936 Weave-It pattern book. I also made several dolls.

Along the way, I discovered this cool, retro plastic loom in a thrift store, the 4" Wonder Weave! I liked it so much that my  husband and I made a video, which is nearing 6,000 hits on Youtube. I know that isn't a huge number, but considering I didn't think it would have 100 hits, it's pretty remarkable.

The idea of looms got me dreaming enough that my Christmas present was a 2' triloom from Hideaway Homestead. It's lovely, and it works like a charm. Within just a few days, I made a shawl!

So, that all led into my new interest–flower looms. The first time I saw flower looms, I yawned and turned away. But then… I just became interested, all at once. Much to my surprise I realized I owned one–the small flower loom Knifty Knitter. (So that's why the pegs come out!) And then, while walking through an antique store yesterday, I saw this interesting little box marked Crazy Daisy Winder. It was $.10. Yes, that's ten cents… a dime. The small, round brass disc has a knob in the center that, when twisted, makes 12 tiny metal rods come out. Those little spikes hold your yarn/thread/metal while you wind on your "petals." Then, you secure the center with a series of clever stitches (the backstitch), and viola! You have a flower. A second twist of the knob, the metal spikes disappear, and the flower comes off the loom. Pretty nifty. From what I can find out, these tiny flower looms were made in the 1940's.

Because my box and loom were missing instructions, my first attempts are pretty sad, so I'll share them with you another day. In the meantime, I've I discovered many wonderful sites dedicated to flower looms. Here are a few:

Coming soon: A Winter Recap (those felted mittens, a really floppy hat, a real picture of my shawl, and a slanted cupcake.)

Mittens, pre-felting

image from www.flickr.com

I knit mittens on my blue Knifty Knitter loom, using the one loom mitten pattern. I changed the cuff by doing two rows of the garter stitch, plus I knitted a few extra rows. Because I used 100% wool, I then felted them.

They shrunk, a little. I'll post another picture soon.

They'll need another good wash/dry to get to the perfect size. The good thing about these is that I'm not really fond of them–if I lose one (which has been my habit this winter–I've lost one mitten and two gloves), then I'll have an excuse to make another pair, maybe in a better color. I bought one of those huge fisherman's wool skeins two years ago, and I've been using it for projects since then. Now, it's nearly gone. Hooray!

Ruffled Cuff Wrist Warmers (I dare you to say that three times fast!)

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

My office is making attempts to save energy, and one of the ways we're accomplishing this is to lower the heat during the winter. And it's cold in January! So, I decided to make myself some wrist warmers to help keep my hands warm while I'm typing away at my job.

I designed these after conducting a fruitless search for wrist warmers (or hand warmers, or fingerless mitts… whatever you call them) made in the round on the blue Knifty Knitter. Having made mittens with the blue loom in the round, I figured there would be many different ideas out there. I found a few patterns, but most asked for small or regular gauge looms. Some were knitted as a flat panel on the blue loom and then stitched into a tube, but I just couldn't find a fairly easy, knitted-in-the-round pattern. So, I made one up off the top of my head!

BIG WARNING: Because I'm not a terrific pattern writer, there may be very easy ways to make a similar item without following these directions. Be creative! And please share with me what you did to improve it!

BIGGER WARNING: I was uncertain how to do the opening for the thumb so I made it up. The next time I make these, I'll probably remove the stitches from pegs 1-5 (Row 31 in the pattern below) and place them on a stitch holder, and then, after the item is off the blue loom, I may transfer the stitches onto the flower loom and knit three or four rows of the garter stitch. Stay tuned for improvements!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

RUFFLED CUFF WRIST WARMERS

Make two.

Needed:

  • Blue Knifty Knitter Loom (24 peg large gauge loom)
  • Knitting hook
  • Crochet hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Stitch makers to mark purling pegs (optional)
  • Yarn, approximately 125 yards: I used two strands of a worsted weight yarn (Patton 100% Merino Wool in Burgundy)

Notes:  

Instructions:

  1. Cast On. I use the cable cast on method.
  2. Rows 1-15 (CUFF): FS two pegs, PS two pegs. Keep up this pattern to create the cuff. Because the FS is a very snug stitch, the cuff looks ruffled when finished. Knit more rows for a longer cuff.
  3. Row 16-30 (BEGINNING OF HAND): FS.
  4. Row 31, PEGS 1-5 (THUMB OPENING): Lift loop from Peg 1 onto a crochet hook. Loop your working yarn over the hook, and pull it through Loop 1. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the loop. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Lift loop from Peg 2 onto you hook and pull through the first loop. Loop your working yarn again and pull through the Loop 2. You now have one loop on your crochet hook. Move to Peg 3. Continue this pattern, creating a single chain, for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. Once Pegs 1-5 are safely crocheted, loop your final loop from your crochet hook onto Peg 6. You now have two loops on Peg 6, and no loops at all on Pegs 1-5.
  5. Row 31 (continued), Pegs 6-24: Knit off Peg 6. FS Pegs 7-24.
  6. Row 32, Pegs 1-5: You want to re-create new loops on your empty pegs. Use your working yarn and wrap Peg 1. Wrap Peg 1 a second time and KO. Wrap Peg 2. Wrap Peg 2 a second time and KO. Do this pattern for Pegs 3, 4, and 5. You will now have loops on all Pegs 1-5, and your working yarn is at Peg 6, ready to continue knitting in the round.
  7. Row 32 (continued), Pegs 6-24: FS Pegs 6-24.
  8. Rows 33-50 (TOP OF HAND): FS. NOTE: Knit as many rows as you'd like at this point. You want the mitt to reach to just below your knuckle area. Mine are a little too long.
  9. Row 51: PS
  10. Row 52-53: FS 2, PS 2. (Another option is: Row 51, PS. Row 52 FS. Row 53 PS.)
  11. Cast off. Use your tapestry needle to weave in any remaining threads.
  12. Finishing the Thumb: Use your crochet hook and yarn. Hook your crochet hook into one of the loops in the thumb opening, and crochet a single chain around the entire thumb opening, using up all the existing loops that border the thumb opening, one at a time. Be creative and make a fancy pattern if you so desire. If you find any open or weak areas areas after you're finished, reinforce these areas by either crocheting them or using some yarn and your tapestry needle and weaving in some reinforcing threads.

Mock Crochet Neck Warmer / Cowl

image from www.flickr.com 
I made this cowl by using two strands of Cascade 100% Merino Wool yarn and the round, yellow Knifty Knitter loom. It's a very loose neck warmer than hangs in folds but can be pulled over your head if you need a little extra warmth.>

The first time I started this, I used the regular e-wrap and one strand of yarn, but I didn't like the ladder-effect I was getting, so I frogged it all. The second time, I switched to using the mock crochet stitch, but it, too, was becoming too loose and airy, so I frogged it again. The third time's the charm–using two strands gave me the perfect thickness, but the stitch is more interesting than the normal e-wrap.

Here's a simple pattern I wrote up:

_______________

Mock Crochet Neck Warmer

  • One skein yarn (Use two strands of worsted weight yarn or one strand of a bulky weight yarn.)
  • Yellow Knifty Knitter
  • Knitting tool

Cast on using your favorite method. (I use the cable cast on.) Start the Mock Crochet Stitch and continue throughout the entire project. Knit approximately 10" to 12". Cast off.

______________

There you have it! It's easy! Mine took approximately four hours from beginning to end.

Wind-powered knitting machine

You can find the strangest things on youtube, like this video of a knitting machine powered by a windmill:

wind knitting machine

 

And this old-fashioned sock knitting machine. It's mesmerizing to watch. (Okay, it's mesmerizing to watch if you like watching vintage sock knitting machines.)

Gearhart Sock Knitting Machine

Current project: I'm making a cowl on the yellow Knifty Knitter loom. I started it by using the pattern found at the Ben Franklin site, but after about 15 rows, I decided I didn't like the look of the plain e-wrap stitch. I was using just one strand of a Cascade wool in blue, and it was looking very ladder-ish. So, I frogged it all and began again, this time using the mock crochet stitch (instructions here). It's a very easy and pretty way to vary your loom knitting.

A not-quite-there-yet mitten

Mitten

I guess when you make something for yourself, you can be extra picky because you’re always checking to make certain it fits. This mitten does not fit!

I used the same ideas I used for my other set of blue loom mittens, only this time, I chose Paton 100% merino wool. I used a double strand, did a ribbed cuff and a gathered top. However, here’s what I don’t like about this poor mitten:

–The cuff is wider than the rest of the mitten. Because I chose the flat stitch for the majority of the mitten, the Purl 1, Flat Stitch 1 ribbing is too loose.

–I started the thumb too early. I need one more row before starting that thumb. now, it rides up a touch right below the thumb.

–The thumb is too snug/short. I should have used more pegs, plus it needed two extra rows.

–The top is too long. Now, here I’m getting picky. It’s only about one row too long.

So, there you have it. A failed mitten. Poor little thing. I intend on frogging it and starting over, making better notes this time. When I have a finished pair, I’ll do another post.

Olive, Loofah’s little sister

Olive
Loofah
Doggietoy

I knitted this doll using the same pattern as Loofah, only on the large end (8 peg) spool Knifty Knitter instead of the flower loom. She’s very tiny, about 4″. I think if I were going to make these dolls to give away, I’d have to find a way to keep the stuffing in place. As it is, you can tell the gaps between each row are so large you can see the polyfill. One idea I had is to use a child’s sock as a way to stuff the doll. I can also use a tighter stitch like I do for the head.

One more problem I’m having is with the hair. Right now, it looks okay, but it’s not durable and wouldn’t stand up to much playing. I separated strands of Lion Wool Ease but as they come apart, it’s easy to tear off sections. I need to research a way to make decent hair.
When we were visiting family over Thanksgiving, I knitted this ball with the flower loom. My plan was to make three of them, print out a “How to Juggle” tutorial, and give them as a gift. However, the little dog of the household got one look at this ball and decided it was hers. How could I refuse that face??

A loomed doll

Loofah

Meet Loofah!

I made this loomed dolly on the smaller (12 peg) flower Knifty Knitter. The pattern is Lulu the Loomed Dolly, and it’s Bev’s from Cottage Garden. She loom knits Lulu Dolls for charity.

When I saw her dolls, and I saw the Lulu that American Girl in Italy made, I had to give it a try. I used Lion brand wool (worsted weight) for the head and some left-over medium-weight wool for the body.

I didn’t have the 18 peg loom that Bev uses, so I used my brand-new flower loom. Compared to the smallest loom in the KK round loom kit, this one has 12 pegs vs. the 24 peg blue loom; however, it’s still large gauge.

It took me awhile to decide what stitch to use, because I knew I wanted the head to look different than the body. After starting four times, I ended up using a 1-over-3 wrapping and just the basic knit stitch. How I do this is I single wrap each peg, and I go completely around four times total. I then knit the bottom loop over the three remaining loops, and I do this for each peg. I then wrap just one strand around all pegs and continue.

I made the head this way by knitting 24 rounds. (If I was using thicker yarn it would have been many fewer times around.) I then switched colors and started the body. I used two strands here, plus I choose the garter stitch. I knitted Loofah’s body to be twice as long as her head.

When I neared the end of the body, I decreased by putting one existing loop on the neighboring peg and knitting off. I did this all around so I was left with six loops. I then gathered them all together just like a hat. I stuffed the doll with polyfill, and gathered the head.

When Loofah was at this stage, I decided the garter stitch wasn’t exactly attractive. It was, in fact, sorta odd looking. Although I had played around with some cutsie names like Magnolia, in the end, she most resembles a loofah gourd, so that’s her name: Loofah.

I knitted a little scarf on my other new KK loom: the spool loom. It makes two different sizes of i-cords. I used the smallest side, and I even added some tiny tassels. I then knitted Loofah a hat, so I went back to the flower loom and knitted about two inches. I decreased the top of the hat and gathered it off. The brim curled up on its own.

Finally, I decided Loofah needed some personality, so I had a try at stitching a face. She has a tiny pink mouth, two blue eyes, and some wild hair. You may notice one of her eyes is crooked–looks like I need some practice!

Because she’s wool, I wonder if she’d felt at all if I washed her. I’d have to de-stuff her first, but it may be a cool look. At this point, though, I’m a little attached to her, and I’d hate it if something bad happened to my lil’ Loofah.

I think Loofah was a great first doll. She’s pretty much a tube with a scarf and hat. Now that I have these smaller looms, it’ll be fun to knit her new things once and awhile like a blankie, shawl, and maybe even a couple of snazzy tube dresses!

By the way, it’s sure nice to have the kitties nearby. Whenever I need help choosing a color, they’re right there to lend a helping paw.