Tag Archives: table runner

Diamond Table Runner and Comfy Throw

 

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image from www.flickr.com

Finished: the 7.5" x 16" table runner, woven with two heddles. Just big enough for a super small table or a mat underneath a lamp and telephone (which is where this one is living for now). I was thrilled to use two heddles and can't wait for the next project. This one involved embroidery thread and I used the Diamonds pattern from The Weaver's Idea Book. Very fun indeed. I don't even mind the bumpy edges (strange, I've read about this thing called a floating selvedge and yet never thought it would be something I need someday…).

Also finished: the shawl, poncho, throw-type weaving. It measures 17.5" x 60". I should have been about 6" longer, but I ran out of the Caron Simply Soft and was too impatient to buy some more. It's plenty long, however, and after knotting the fringes and trimming them to about 4", I called it done. It's now flung over the top of a chair. The pattern gives it a rustic look and I'm pleased with it.

The cat picture has a story. She suddenly flung herself onto the throw and skidded to the edge of the table. I snapped the picture just as she turned, shot across to the other side, jumped into her little basket, and skidded over the other edge where she landed on the ground. We think she was embarrassed.

Fun with Two Heddles

 

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I've been having a great time using two 10 dent heddles with my new double heddle kit I bought for my Emilia. I've never had to think so hard about threading. It was a brain teaser, but once done (by studying my Jane Patrick book, numerous websites and blogs, and also discussions on Ravelry), it all makes sense. Really! Basically, it's pulling four ends through each of the back heddle (also known as heddle II). Wind on your warp. Pull one strand from each grouping into each eye. So, when heddle II is warped, it has three ends in the slots, one end in an eye.

Then, you add in the front heddle (also known as heddle I) and it gets a little muddy, but in a nutshell, you pull two slot ends into a slot, the third slot end into an eye, and the final fourth end, which had been in the eye of heddle II, into the slot on the far side of the eye you just sleyed. Okay… make sense? Good! Continue on down, warping all of heddle I. 

Now, you're ready! See? It's easy!

Well, not really. Would you believe it took me three hours? To warp 8" across? And just 36" long? Yes? Then you'd be wrong, because it actually took three and a half hours. Now, the next time, it'll be a cinch. 

Once all that warp was carefully tied on, I was ready to weave… something… didn't know what… So, I pulled out Jane Patrick's book, picked a pattern from the Double Heddle chapter, and started weaving. I chose the Diamond pattern, mostly because it uses two heddles and no pickup sticks. (Yes, you can add in pickup sticks!) And there was much head scratching and pulling out of weft and so on as I followed the eight steps to complete one pattern section, until I finally realized it made sense and I was weaving the diamond pattern.

I'm using a variety of browns, reds, and off-whites from my embroidery thread collection. It's pretty, and even though my brain was taxed, it was worth it.

Red Table Runner

 

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image from www.flickr.com

 

I just finished this very red table runner for my mom, using white crochet cotton for the warp (J.P. Coats, size 10) and warped 14" wide. I was hoping for a weft-faced project with the bright red (Sugar 'n Cream) taking center stage. However, the white does have a presence, which I didn't mind so much once it was off the loom. I like leno lace and so wove one row on either end. The ends were simply tied and trimmed. 

The table runner started life as 14" wide, went down to 12" wide off the loom, and after washing, measured in at 11.5". The length shrunk from 30" long to, after washing, 27.5". So, let that be a lesson to you! Cotton shrinks, even without water.