Tag Archives: weave-it

Update on Loom Holdings

Quite awhile ago, in fact nearly three years ago, I posted what I thought was an impressive list of all the little weaving and knitting looms I had accumulated up to that time. It was just about then I started becoming interested in weaving, and I was making a pretty clear switch from knitting to weaving. I still do an occasional knitting project, but most of my time is spent in weaving world. So, maybe it's time for an updated list? I think it's interesting that all of the looms from my old list could have probably been stored in one medium-sized plastic bin, but I still thought it was excessive.

Then:

  • The Knifty Knitter round loom set (four looms)
  • The Knifty Knitter flower loom and spool knitter (two looms)
  • The purple Knifty Knitter rectangle loom
  • Five 4" Square Looms: Two 4" Weave-its, One 4" Simplex loom, One 4" Hazel Rose Multiloom, One 4" Wonder Weave
  • One Weave-it Rug loom
  • One Regular Gauge hat loom
  • One 24" Homestead Hideaway triangle loom
  • Two potholder looms
  • One extra fine gauge DecorAccents oval sock loom
  • Three small flower looms

Now… (I've kept every one of those, plus added a few.)

  • Glimakra Emilia rigid heddle loom 18" (with stand, extra heddles, etc.)
  • Erica 25" rigid heddle loom
  • Kessenich 14" two harness table loom
  • Peacock 12" two harness table loom
  • Louet W30 12" eight harness table loom
  • Ashford 16" four harness table loom
  • Soon-to-arrive 7' modular triloom
  • Schacht inkle loom
  • A teeny tiny wooden rigid heddle loom called a Samuel Gabriel loom
  • Two more Weave-Its. (Why stop? They jump into my hands at antique stores.)
  • Two Authentic Knitting Boards (10" and 28") plus the extenders for weaving
  • Another Wonder Weave ($5! I bet you couldn't resist, either.)
  • A 1940's blue plastic EZEE Knitter fine gauge loom
  • A homemade wooden knitting rake
  • A homemade round hat knitting loom
  • A couple more daisy wheel flower looms
  • A backstrap loom, made by me (For the record, this is the only loom I actually made that works, and yes, it's essentially four sticks and some yarn.)

Okay, we've gone way past the medium plastic bin storage idea!

For some reason–and not just because I'm running out of room in my tiny 8'x9' office–with the recent purchase of the 7' triloom, I feel I've actually come full circle. The first looms I had an interest in were the 4" square looms and the little Wonder Weave rigid heddle loom. I then bought my first triloom. Little did I know that those simple looms would teach me the basics of weaving. From there, I let things slide, weaving-wise, until the next fall, about a year later, when I suddenly had an urge to buy a "real" loom. But first, with my inquisitive nature and with some helpful words from a Ravelry weaver, along with Laverne's fantastic series on backstrap weaving at Weavezine, I put together a backstrap loom (and chiseled my hand in the process!), and figured out lifting patterns for plain weave, weft-faced projects. It was about five months later that I bought the Emilia loom.

My looms, every one, are still portable and small enough to fold up and store on a shelf or under the desk. So, my little saying on the top of my blog, "weaving and knitting on small looms," still holds water. (Do I sound a little defiant?) And yet, I think I really started weaving because I wanted to follow the fibers visually and figure out how structure was created. If you've ever seen a triloom, you'll know the weaver walks the yarn from side to side, hooking it onto opposing nails and weaving over and under the horizontal threads that are created in the process. It's called continuous weave, where the warp and weft are woven at the same time. It's not fine weaving with silken threads, but it suits me. (And if I want to use silken threads, well, I just fire up the little Louet W30!!)

With all that said, I have two looms in the mix that will probably need new homes, the Peacock and the Kessenich. Both also need some work, but I'll post more about that in the future if I decide to wave goodbye.

Inside the Box

Inside the box, spotted and purchased at a flea market, was a Weave-It in a particularly mint box, a nearly-finished sweater (the Urbanite), crochet and cotton yarn, two wooden tubes filled with steel knitting needles, and a page from a 1949 Des Moines newspaper. There were also a few finished projects: baby booties and a mohair beret. This knitter liked fine work.

I can't walk away from something like this, a glimpse into a crafter's past life, even if it makes me sneeze.

Inside the Box

Inside the Box

Inside the Box

Inside the Box

Inside the Box

Log Cabin Strap

 

 

  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
  • image from www.flickr.com
image from www.flickr.com

I wove a narrow sample of the log cabin pattern on my rigid heddle loom. It's long enough to become a strap for a bag or purse, or trim on something like a bag or a purse. Because I used two similar colors, green and blue, the pattern doesn't stand out clearly but I still like it. To do a log cabin pattern, you simply need to warp the colors in the correct order, followed by using the same pattern in the weft. For example, on this small strap I did BGBGBG and then GBGBGB (repeat). Again, the weft follows the same number and color, BGBGBG followed by GBGBGB. Easy! I'd love to do a wider project.

And then there's this sad Weave-It loom. Marked a dollar, I couldn't pass it up. I wondered if I should try to glue it but then decided that I already have three of the 4" squares, so for a dollar, it can be my spare peg loom in case I ever need parts.

Weave-It rug loom video

The Weave-It Rug Loom is one of my favorite little looms. Awhile back, I was lucky enough to find this one at an antique store along with a plastic 4" Weave-It. The Rug Loom is a little bigger at 5" square and it has fewer pegs, but you wrap it exactly the same as the smaller loom. It was meant for using bulky, or a "rug" weight of yarn, and most of the patterns I've seen from the old booklets are for afghans or stuffed toys.
I like my Weave-It Rug Loom so much that I had to make a video. Hope you enjoy it!
Weave-It Rug Loom

Authentic Knitting Board

I caved and purchased the 28" small gauge (84 pegs!) Authentic Knitting Board today from Hobby Lobby. However, I waited until Hobby Lobby had a 40% off weekly special and so the $37.00 board was purchased for just about $20. Not a bad deal. Why do I need another loom, you may wonder? Especially, when I already own…

  • The Knifty Knitter round loom set (four looms)
  • The Knifty Knitter flower loom and spool knitter (two looms)
  • The purple Knifty Knitter rectangle loom
  • Five 4" Square Looms: Two 4" Weave-its, One 4" Simplex loom, One 4" Hazel Rose Multiloom, One 4" Wonder Weave
  • One Weave-it Rug loom
  • One Regular Gauge hat loom
  • One 24" Homestead Hideaway triangle loom
  • Two potholder looms
  • One extra fine gauge DecorAccents oval sock loom
  • Three small flower looms

Someday, I'll take a picture of them all 🙂 . All 22 of them…

But back to the question–why do I need another loom? In this case, the answer is pretty simple–I don't have a small gauge loom. At all! Plus, I really like double-knit. So, there. That's why I plotted and planned and waited and finally purchased my new knitting board today. I have plans for two Christmas presents to be knitted on this board, so I'd better get knitting.

As far as patterns, there are some free patterns on the Authentic Knitting Board website. I discovered a few more on the Lion Brand pattern site, and there is a fairly new Yahoo group for the knitting board, not to mention the other sites, boards, listservs, and Ravelry groups that include knitting board information along with knitting looms, so I think I'll have more than enough to think about. What I'm most excited about is moving away from super bulky yarn for a few projects.

Another Super Amazing Loom Find?

Can it be true? Did I really walk into a local antique store last week and less than 20 minutes later, leave with all these looms??? Most in the original boxes with the original instructions and needles and everything? Did it really happen?

  • 5" Weave-It Rug Loom
  • 4" Weave-it Loom
  • 2" Weave-it Loom
  • Lily Speed-O-Weave Loom

And then did I really wander into a second antique store and leave with a Crazy Daisy Winder?

And did I really spend just under $20 for the entire find? Really? Me?!

Or, did I dream it all?

Stay tuned to find out!

Weave-it Squares

I bought this hand-dyed wool blend this weekend, and at first I wasn't certain I was wise to spend that $25. (Yes, $25!). The colors, although lovely, seemed to cry out "baby blanket." However, now that I see it on the Weave-it, I sorta like it. It could even turn it into something other than a baby blanket, especially since I don't know anyone with a baby, and I don't have a long enough attention span to make a blanket. The nice thing about Weave-it squares is that you can keep on weaving them and then decide what you're going to make after you have a nice pile.

These are my first two squares made with my pre-patented Weave-it with the goofy numbering. After I read Jana's instructions, I was able to correctly wind the yarn and weave the 4th row. Thanks, Jana!

Weave-It Loom?

EDITED (4/29): Thank you to Jana who identified this as the earliest of Weave-it looms. The numbers are "wrong," and it had yet to be patented. Thanks, too, to those at Ravelry who gave me instructions on how to use this loom to make a perfect Weave-It square.

ORIGINAL POST: I'm trying to identify one of my 4" looms that I found at a thrift store. I assume it's a Weave-it loom, but the markings on the corners don't match other Weave-its I've seen. It's wooden with dove-tailed corners, and it has a #1 and #2 marked on it, kitty-corner to each other. There is also a red "W" with an arrow and another faint red arrow. On the back it says "Patent Applied For. Made in USA." Any ideas?

Mysteryloom1Mysteryloom2Mysteryloom3Mysteryloom4